Surf the web safely

Any time you visit a website, you leave a trail of data behind you. You can’t stop it all — that’s just how the internet works. But there are plenty of things that you can do to reduce your footprint. Here are a two tips to cover most of your bases.

Reconsider your web plug-ins

Remember Flash ? How about Java? You probably haven’t seen much of them recently, because the web has evolved to render them obsolete. Both Flash and Java, two once-popular web plug-ins, let you view interactive content in your web browser. But nowadays, most of that has been replaced by HTML5, a technology native to your web browser. Flash and Java were long derided for their perpetual state of insecurity. They were full of bugs and vulnerabilities that plagued the internet for years — so much so that web browsers started to pull the plug on Java back in 2015, with Flash set to sunset in 2020. Good riddance!

If you don’t use them — and most people don’t anymore — you should remove them. Just having them installed can put you at risk of attack. It takes just a minute to uninstall Flash on indows and Mac, and to uninstall Java on Windows and Mac.

Most browsers — like Firefox and Chrome — let you run other add-ons or extensions to improve your web experience. Like apps on your phone, they often require certain access to your browser, your data or even your computer. Although browser extensions are usually vetted and checked to prevent malicious use, sometimes bad extensions slip through the net. Sometimes, extensions that were once fine are automatically updated to contain malicious code or secretly mine cryptocurrency in the background.

There’s no simple rule to what’s a good extension and what isn’t. Use your judgment. Make sure each extension you install doesn’t ask for more access than you think it needs. And make sure you uninstall or remove any extension that you no longer use. Good site navigation: https://www.rencontrepapygay.com

These plug-ins and extensions can protect you

There are some extensions that are worth their weight in gold. You should consider:

An ad-blocker: Ad-blockers are great for blocking ads — as the name suggests — but also the privacy invasive code that can track you across sites. uBlock is a popular, open source efficient blocker that doesn’t consume as much memory as AdBlock and others. Many ad-blockers now permit “acceptable ads” that allow publishers to still make money but aren’t memory hogs or intrusive — like the ones that take over your screen. Ad-blockers also make websites load much faster.

A cross-site tracker blocker: Privacy Badger is a great tool that blocks tiny “pixel”-sized trackers that are hidden on web pages but track you from site to site, learning more about you to serve you ads. To advertisers and trackers, it’s as if you vanish. Ghostery is another example of an advanced-level anti-tracker that aims to protect the user by default from hidden trackers.

And you could also consider switching to more privacy-minded search engines, like DuckDuckGo, a popular search engine that promises to never store your personal information and doesn’t track you to serve ads.

Use Tor if you want a better shot at anonymity

But if you’re on the quest for anonymity, you’ll want Tor. Tor, known as the anonymity network is a protocol that bounces your internet traffic through a series of random relay servers dotted across the world that scrambles your data and covers your tracks. You can configure it on most devices and routers. Most people who use Tor will simply use the Tor Browser, a preconfigured and locked-down version of Firefox that’s good to go from the start — whether it’s a regular website, or an .onion site — a special top-level domain used exclusively for websites accessible only over Tor. Navigate safely on the site lesrencontresseniors.com.

Tor makes it near-impossible for anyone to snoop on your web traffic, know which site you’re visiting, or that you are the person accessing the site. Activists and journalists often use Tor to circumvent censorship and surveillance.

But Tor isn’t a silver bullet. Although the browser is the most common way to access Tor, it also — somewhat ironically — exposes users to the greatest risk. Although the Tor protocol is largely secure, most of the bugs and issues will be in the browser. The FBI has been known to use hacking tools to exploit vulnerabilities in the browser in an effort to unmask criminals who use Tor. That puts the many ordinary, privacy-minded people who use Tor at risk, too.

It’s important to keep the Tor browser up to date and to adhere to its warnings. The Tor Project, which maintains the technology, has a list of suggestions — including changing your browsing behavior — to ensure you’re as protected as you can be. That includes not using web plug-ins, not downloading documents and files through Tor, and keeping an eye out for in-app warnings that advise you on the best action.

Just don’t expect Tor to be fast. It’s not good for streaming video or accessing bandwidth-hungry sites. For that, a VPN would probably be better.